Periodical Formats in the Market: Economies of Space and Time, Competition and Transfer / Periodische Formate auf dem Markt: Ökonomien von Raum und Zeit, Konkurrenz und Transfer

7–17 June 2021

organised by the DFG Research Unit 2288 Journal Literature

Deadline for 300-word abstracts: 20 December 2020

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the 9th conference of the European Society for Periodical Research at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, will be held online. The virtual event aims to bring scholars together, to present and discuss recent work on periodicals, to meet in virtual coffee breaks, to get in touch, and to keep in touch. We welcome proposals from researchers at all stages of their careers from various disciplines.

Week 1 (7–11 June 2021)

Live kick-off session with keynote lecture on Monday, 7 June 2021
Launch of pre-recorded presentations and panels at the conference website
Postgraduate Workshop

Week 2 (14–17 June 2021)

Keynote, Plenary Panels, Roundtable
ESPRit Business Meeting
Live Q&A-sessions in the afternoon (CET) to discuss the papers of the first week
Social time and virtual coffee breaks

We welcome proposals for pre-recorded original papers of 15 minutes and panels of 3–4 papers, or live roundtables (with up to 6 discussants) concerning the conference topic: Periodical Formats in the Market: Economies of Space and Time, Competition and Transfer. We kindly ask to prepare your pre-recorded presentation by 31 March 2021. Accepted presentations are already part of the program, you don’t need to send a new proposal!

The conference seeks to examine journals from the 18th to the 21th century within the market and its sociocultural, economic, and legal frameworks, exploring two main areas:

  • economies of time and space, e. spatiotemporal aspects of the production, distribution, and reception of periodicals and similar serialized formats, and
  • facets of competition and transfer between periodicals within localised and regional as well as international

For this purpose, the conference looks at periodicals as agents that react to sociocultural space configurations while simultaneously participating in their nascency, formation, appearance, and perpetual transformation. The conference seeks to advance theoretical approaches, established analytical methods, and analysis oriented towards the spatiotemporal dimensions of periodical culture. To achieve this goal, the 9th ESPRit conference invites theoretical input, case studies, and comparative analysis from philological, philosophical, as well as sociological perspectives from all disciplines (such as philology, media history, history of publishing and printing, comparative literature, cultural studies, gender studies, visual studies, postcolonial studies).

Possible topics and case studies include but are not limited to:

  • the formation of periodicals and (international) periodical culture in their relation to space and time;
  • the representation and/or production of cultural, temporal, and/or geographic distance in periodicals;
  • spaces and geographies of production and distribution: spatiotemporal parameters and frameworks like postal service, newsrooms and pressrooms, relations between editorial boards;
  • spaces and geographies of reception: newsagents, cafés, salons, communes, urban/suburban/underground spaces;
  • the writing/printing space: private, semi-public and public writing/printing spaces, technological change and its influence on format and layout;
  • periodicals and utopias/dystopias;
  • cultural, economic, or legal forces of regional, national, or international diversification and exchange within periodical culture, copyright, news agencies, clipping services;
  • material dimensions of journals in space and time: volumes and/or issues of periodicals as visual, tangible, and corruptible objects, contaminations between book forms and journals, paratextual strategies for attracting or evolving reading publics;
  • specific forms of concurrence, competition, and transfer of/in periodicals within certain epochs and in the market of (often interrelated) cities or countries;
  • the translation of periodicals across time and

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to conference organisers Christian A. Bachmann, Andreas Beck, Mirela Husić, Nora Ramtke, and Monika Schmitz-Emans (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) no later than 20 December 2020. Please include name, institutional affiliation, email address, and a short CV (150 words). Individual pre-recorded presentations should be 20 minutes long. We especially welcome proposals for pre-recorded panels of 3 or 4 speakers and live roundtables with up to 6 discussants. The conference language will be English; German presentations are also welcome. Further information, including details regarding registration, will be published on the conference website: www.rub.de/esprit2020.

We look forward to welcoming you to this virtual ESPRit conference!

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.www.rub.de/esprit2020

In the Spring of 2021, ESPRit organises a series of online seminars in collaboration with ETMIET/KENI, Panteion University, Athens: Crossover influences and local identities of the popular illustrated periodicals of the 19th and twentieth centuries

 The second session of the series will be held on 16 April from  3-4PM CET.

Chair: Sophie Oliver (Liverpool University)

Speakers: 

1. Charlotte Lauder (AHRC-funded PhD student, University of Strathclyde and National Library of Scotland), “Pithy people: the People’s Friend, a national magazine for Scotland”

The People’s Friend was established in 1869 in Dundee, Scotland, as a magazine for Scottish people, and is still published from that city today. A weekly illustrated penny magazine, the People’s Friend set out in 1869 to ‘encourage the literary talent which we know exists among the people’ by publishing ‘Scotch stories, poetry, and other articles, written by Scotchmen’. By 1905, the People’s Friend had created popular magazine culture in Scotland and came to define Scottish literature for the masses. How did it do this? How did a provincial literary magazine managed to sell an average of 212,600 copies per week by 1890? This presentation explores how the People’s Friend became Scotland’s most popular penny weekly magazine. It assesses the landscape of popular literature in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Scotland and the importance of magazine culture within it.

2. Júlia Fazekas (ELTE University, Budapest), “Popularity of Hungarian and European fashion magazines in the 1840s”

The Hungarian fashion magazines gained notable popularity in the 1840s. They were modelled after other European magazines and previous Hungarian periodicals. These magazines aimed to gain a wide readership and wanted to shape the literary sphere, publish influential works, and facilitate Hungarian education and reading through them. They mainly focused on literature, and during this period they were the most significant literary source. They contained a mixture of texts, not just literary works – they were concerned with entertainment, gossip, local and foreign news (even political content), and fashion. I believe that this thematical variety and the relation between different elements is particularly interesting in this research. In my presentation I want to look at how these fashion magazines gained popularity in Hungary and Europe. My main question is how this type of periodical can be examined from the perspective of popularity, and how their position could vary in different countries.

 

The seminar will be held online via Zoom. All are welcome to attend. Please enter your details below in order to receive the meeting link.

 

Registration ESPRit online seminar 16 April 2021

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In the Spring of 2021, ESPRit organises a series of online seminars in collaboration with ETMIET/KENI, Panteion University, Athens: Crossover influences and local identities of the popular illustrated periodicals of the 19th and twentieth centuries

 

The inaugural session of the series will be held on 26 March from 12-1PM CET

Chair: Peter Buse (Liverpool University)

Keynote speaker: Victoria Kuttainen (Associate Professor English and Writing, James Cook University, Australia) 

Title: Portholes, Channels, and Seductions: The Messy Affordances of Antipodean Periodical Scholarship  

In a well-known essay in published in The New Left Review in 2000, Franco Moretti called for a new approach to literary history that would capture the enormous abundance and variety of world literature. In his subsequent 2005 book, Graphs, Maps, and Trees: Abstract Models for Literary History, he proposed various ways to approach the field from the perspective of distant reading: graphing the rise and fall of the novel in various countries, mapping various literary geographies from village stories to the larger transits enabled by the modern industrial railway , and tracing an evolutionary tree of developing literary forms. Though Moretti’s work expanded the universe of literary study beyond a narrow band of canonical texts usually offered up for study, it was criticised for still yet focusing on history’s “winners”—famous novels, mostly written in English.

Taking its cue from Moretti’s ways of thinking about the literary field, this presentation reflects on the conceptual possibilities offered by periodical study, and in doing so it offers a perspective of culture not from the standpoint of the “winners” but from the “other side.” The etymology of the “antipodes” means quite literally “the other side” or “the other foot.” Scholarship from the Global South in general and from Australia in my specific experience has offered me as scholar originating from Britain and North America alternative ways to view established narratives of world culture and literary history, in particular.

This presentation looks at a few conceptual possibilities that have offered themselves up through a decade of research on 1920s and 1930s' Australian magazines, a journey that began by asking the random question, on an airplane journey over the Pacific, “how come there are so few Australian novels about the sea?” It proposes that what Sean Latham called the “Mess and the Muddle” of modernist periodical scholarship offers particularly rich insights when undertaken from an antipodean perspective, about the print culture of colonial modernity. And it suggests that this perspective can be viewed as kind of heterotopic site for European modernity. 

Watch the recording of this lecture here:

In the Spring of 2021, ESPRit organises a series of online seminars in collaboration with ETMIET/KENI, Panteion University, Athens: Crossover influences and local identities of the popular illustrated periodicals of the 19th and twentieth centuries

 

The third session of the series will be held on 14 May from  3-4PM CET

Chair: Andrés Mario Zervigón (Rutgers University)

Speakers: 

1. Patrick Roessler (University of Erfurt), “From Simplicissimus to Simplicus and Der Simpl. Satire magazines between Nazi gleichschaltung and exile, 1934-35”

After fleeing to Prague, German exiles launched a satire magazine (together with their Czech colleagues) named after the famous (but meanwhile aligned) Simplicissimus in order to fight the Nazi regime. My presentation would shed some light on the widely unknown backgrounds of this media crossover under conditions of political suppression.

2. Mary Ikoniadou (University of Central Lancashire), “Refugee publishing. The case study of the Greek political refugees in East Germany. Imaginings and aesthetics of repatriation amidst Cold War borders”

The presentation will consider publishing as a site in which refugee populations can challenge official narratives of nationhood while simultaneously claim belonging to a 'homeland' and a national body from which they have been displaced. Through the case study of Pyrsos illustrated magazine published in East Germany in the 1960s by Greek political refugees of the Civil War, the presentation will argue that visual, and material analysis can offer an in-depth understanding of the complexity of the political refugees' claims. It will demonstrate that the juxtaposition of images and texts in the design of the magazine alongside its editorial and distribution strategies challenged the position of its readers: it invited particular ways of reading and knowing that embodied political experiences and affective responses whilst incited imagined national cultural identities.

 

This seminar will be held online via Zoom. All are welcome to attend. Please enter your details below in order to receive the meeting link.

 

Registration ESPRit online seminar 14 May 2021

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(plus preceding Workshop on Academic Poster Presentations)

11 June 2021

(15 & 22 April 2021)

Deadline for 500-word abstracts: 28 February 2021

In conjunction with the virtual 9th ESPRit Conference “Periodical Formats in the Market”, a virtual postgraduate workshop will be held on 11 June 2021. The workshop is open to postgraduate students working on any topic with regard to periodicals from any historical period, geographical origin, and cultural context. Personalised feedback will be offered by a committee comprising ESPRit members and members of the DFG Research Unit 2288 Journal Literature.

In addition to the virtual workshop an 11 June 2021, there will be an online workshop on 15 & 22 April 2021 where all workshop participants will get a professional training on the concept and design of academic posters (15 April) and their effective presentations (22 April).

This workshop will be held in English by a communication designer and trainer via ZOOM.

To apply, please send a 500-word abstract of the thesis to be presented in a poster presentation and a short CV (150 words) including name, institutional affiliation, and email address to the organisers no later than 28 February 2021 (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

We look forward to welcoming you to the virtual workshop!